Why They Are Important

For more than 100 years, HBCUs have been educating minorities, giving them economic opportunities and instilling great values.

Not only have they consistently produced leaders in their communities and across the nation, but HBCUs today are consistently and affordably producing the leaders of the future.

Today, the nation’s 106 HBCUs make up just 3% of America’s colleges and universities, yet they produce almost 20% of all African American graduates and 25% of African American graduates in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics — the critical industries of the future.

On average, more than 300,000 students attend HBCUs each year, and 80% of them are African Americans.

HBCUs have been providing diverse learning environments — from students to faculty to administration — ensuring that every student has a chance to succeed.

HBCUs are rooted in faith, community and service. Black churches have long been pillars of the black community and the history and life of black colleges are closely intertwined with faith, values and service to others.